Review: Blankets by Craig Thompson

Maybe I was asking for too much.

Back then, this was the classic recipe of an average teenage life. Where people were heavily influenced by religion. Where sibling rivalry was such a trend. Where puppy love was something innocent. So for a 90’s kid perspective, like me, it all sounds relatable. Something, I thought, I want to read.

Although classified as an autobiographical memoir, it did not feel completely genuine. I’m not saying that Craig Thompson’s a liar and that he made everything up. The story, his story, just doesn’t feel 100% honest. It felt that there were a lot of parts that he skipped and/or refurbished. And thus, it didn’t look entirely true.

Plus, numerous times I keep on wishing that he would’ve explained further including the child molestation, struggle with religion and the break up part because it would’ve helped me understand Craig’s situation better. Reading Blankets, felt like you’re miles away from giving a fuck. An observer, is what I would call it, to feel distant that there is little to no connection between the reader and character.

Which is one of the reason’s why it took me forever to review this one was because after finishing reading, I didn’t feel anything–it felt like nothing. So naturally, I wrote nothing.

On to the brighter side, the illustrations were fantastic! It leans more on the cartoony side, which I believe is Craig’s forte. I provided pictures for you, burnners, below! So enjoy!

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Do I like it: It could be better

Recommended to: To people who once loved

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 1, 499)


Below are information about this book.

Publication:August 5th 2003 by Top Shelf Productions (first published July 1st 2003)

From Goodreads:

Wrapped in the landscape of a blustery Wisconsin winter, Blankets explores the sibling rivalry of two brothers growing up in the isolated country, and the budding romance of two coming-of-age lovers. A tale of security and discovery, of playfulness and tragedy, of a fall from grace and the origins of faith.

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