Review: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

FightClub

Too much testosterone.

Fight Club has been my second Palahniuk read. So far, there’s one thing I’ve noticed: It’s either he loves putting sexual element to his books or he’s just pretty horny. You decide.

Continue reading “Review: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk”

Book Blogger Hop: Blogging Experience

Blogging Experience

Back story: I was supposed to post my Top Ten Tuesday but the topic (Top Ten Sequels I Can’t Wait To Get) didn’t fit me quite well. I only read few series and tons of stand-alone. And if I do read one, I make sure that I have every single book in that series. Because I’ve been traumatized by cliffhangers and spoilers. So you know..safety first.

So introducing this is new meme, which is Book Blogger Hop! Where they post and ask a particular question of the week and I answer them.

This week’s question is: 

As you grow in your blogging experience, have you become more particular in terms of what you will post on your blog or what books you will read for review on your blog?

My blog is fairly new. It’s quite young; I only started this year. Soo in terms of my “experience”, I’ve always been particular of what to post. I might have an OCD (Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder). You know, a person who gets satisfied when everything is neatly set and organized. Something like this:

Well I’m not that crazy.. yet. And if I have to be really really honest. I have this thing: I just can’t stand minor errors in my blog posts. Like typos, missing comma, spacing, alignment and such. Hence, this madness:

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But no worries, my minimum revisions are usually 8 or so. Which is normal, right? RIGHT?

Besides that, I do have a theme. Which is plain, I know. Maybe boring. But I have my reasons: so that whatever picture I post won’t clash with the blog and it will stand out more. If you’re familiar to my blog, I always put my physical copy (usually) of the book I’m reviewing and also the price (in pesos). And I categorize them in that way–here.

I have nothing against books that are not in physical copy such as e-book and audio. It’s just that I’m not just a reader; I’m also a book collector as well, even an addict. So I prefer them tangible. See: (Btw, that’s not everything. I just can’t make it fit in one picture)

Screen Shot 2014-11-18 at 4.57.58 PMAnd I’m open to any kind of books–fiction and non-fiction. Well maybe not Erotica. But yes, I’ve read Fifty Shades of Gray and let’s just say it was scarring. Just full of sex, really. Which is pretty appropriate, I think.

I review books that pique my interest doesn’t matter what genre it’s in. And it’s usually Adult, specifically historical fiction. I read YA here and there but I have a hard time stoping my eyes from rolling. I guess it’s safe to say that I’m quite picky when it comes to YA. But I read it nonetheless, I just don’t do it often.

What books do you review? What do you prefer the most? And if you have a particular theme you post in your blog? Tell me! Comment down below and share! 🙂

(Hosted by: Ramblings of A Coffee Addicted Writer)

(Besides the book shelf, pictures are not mine)

Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

OceanAtTheEnd

Dude this guy can write anything.

A Neil Gaiman book doesn’t have a mind-blowing factor; it’s never overwhelming. With this guy, it’s the simplicity, the casualness that reels you in. The way he weaves fantasies to our world. How he creates fantasies that are often mistook as illusions or delusions today. The notion that fantasy is created in our world, so it must belong here.

Ocean at the End of the Lane is definitely your portal back to your childhood. To feel what it’s like to be scared, to cry, to run away, to be a kid again. Neil Gaiman should have his own genre, really. I don’t know why it isn’t invented yet.

How do I even begin to describe this book? It’s like reading someone else’s childhood–is the closest thing I can get. Not just reading actually. You get to experience someone’s childhood. Since the story has a personal feel to it. Said in a confidential and intimate manner that can’t help but penetrate your heart. And throughout the story, you’ll get to find and reconnect bits and pieces of your previous childhood.

Also I like how time is separated in this book, by either before or after. How childhood is categorized as “before”, considered as something to be left in the past. The notion that we cannot bring our past self with us, that we can’t be the same kid. So we tuck our childhood, our self away and lock it. Never to be seen again. That’s why we consider our childhood our old self. And our adult phase, our new self. Why is there a need to change? Why do we have to detach our self in order to we grow up? Why can’t we be the same person, the same “me”? (Getting really deep now) This book points that out. That we have a tendency, more like a stage, to disconnect ourselves and create a barrier in which we separate our old selves to our new. And I loved it.

Plus the characters were phenomenal. Where can I buy my own Lettie Hempstock?

*A side note: The back cover of the book, the pale boy standing on a water pipe or drain or something. It’s actually Neil Gaiman, himself, age 7.

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: It’s a given already.

Recommended to: To people who lost their childhood

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 640)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: June 18th 2013 by William Morrow Books

From Goodreads:

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly’s wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

Review: In the Woods (Dublin Murder Squad #1) by Tana French

inthewoodsThis is a lonely book.

Ryan. I did not love or hate any character in general; but I did care for them nonetheless. This is in Detective Ryan’s POV, which is the protagonist. He’s very.. childlike, very in need of love. The way he handles things, as if he always needs to be protected, to be cradled. But since he acts like a kid, he tends to be annoying as well. Sometimes he gets on my nerves with his selfish decisions and his intense pride. But try as I might, I can’t blame him. He’s a lost kid. And he longs for something. His childhood, maybe? Family? Love? He’s a mystery—actually he’s the mystery we’re trying to solve. If you ask me, Ryan puts the R in tragic.

Writing. I have to admit, it is too long. But the way she wrote it was soo alluring. I just can’t help but not to read it slowly, to make every word sink in. It’s beautifully crafted. Not like pretty or lovely but very sensual and sultry.

The story focuses more on mystery than the crime itself. And I would’ve never expected that.

This is the first “crime” story that made me feel devastated, as if the real mystery weren’t solved. My heart goes out to Ryan. Since they say that this will be the last time we’ll ever hear of him, I will miss you

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: Yes

Recommended to: To people who want to know what real darkness feels like

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 630)

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Below are information about this book.

Publication: May 17th 2007 by Viking Adult (first published January 1st 2007)

From Goodreads:

As dusk approaches a small Dublin suburb in the summer of 1984, mothers begin to call their children home. But on this warm evening, three children do not return from the dark and silent woods. When the police arrive, they find only one of the children gripping a tree trunk in terror, wearing blood-filled sneakers, and unable to recall a single detail of the previous hours.

Twenty years later, the found boy, Rob Ryan, is a detective on the Dublin Murder Squad and keeps his past a secret. But when a twelve-year-old girl is found murdered in the same woods, he and Detective Cassie Maddox—his partner and closest friend—find themselves investigating a case chillingly similar to the previous unsolved mystery. Now, with only snippets of long-buried memories to guide him, Ryan has the chance to uncover both the mystery of the case before him and that of his own shadowy past.

Richly atmospheric, stunning in its complexity, and utterly convincing and surprising to the end, In the Woods is sure to enthrall fans of Mystic River and The Lovely Bones. And look for French’s new mystery, Broken Harbor, for more of the Dublin Murder Squad.

Waiting on Wednesday: The Secret Place (Dublin Murder Squad #5) by Tana French

The Secret Place (Dublin Murder Squad #5) by Tana French

Publication: September 2nd 2014 by Viking Adult (first published August 26th 2014)

From Goodreads:

The photo on the card shows a boy who was found murdered, a year ago, on the grounds of a girls’ boarding school in the leafy suburbs of Dublin. The caption says, I KNOW WHO KILLED HIM.

Detective Stephen Moran has been waiting for his chance to get a foot in the door of Dublin’s Murder Squad—and one morning, sixteen-year-old Holly Mackey brings him this photo. The Secret Place, a board where the girls at St. Kilda’s School can pin up their secrets anonymously, is normally a mishmash of gossip and covert cruelty, but today someone has used it to reignite the stalled investigation into the murder of handsome, popular Chris Harper. Stephen joins forces with the abrasive Detective Antoinette Conway to find out who and why.

But everything they discover leads them back to Holly’s close-knit group of friends and their fierce enemies, a rival clique—and to the tangled web of relationships that bound all the girls to Chris Harper. Every step in their direction turns up the pressure. Antoinette Conway is already suspicious of Stephen’s links to the Mackey family. St. Kilda’s will go a long way to keep murder outside their walls. Holly’s father, Detective Frank Mackey, is circling, ready to pounce if any of the new evidence points toward his daughter. And the private underworld of teenage girls can be more mysterious and more dangerous than either of the detectives imagined.

The Secret Place is a powerful, haunting exploration of friendship and loyalty, and a gripping addition to the Dublin Murder Squad series.

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)

Review: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Storiedlife

“My life is in these books, he wants to tell her. Read these and know my heart.”

Feels. I’m sorry for using this cliché word, but I’ll put it to good use. If I could just quote the whole book, I would. Quote every single sentence up without any shame, I would. Who would have known that what lies behind this unpretentious book would hold the sole meaning of WHY we read and WHY SHOULD we read. It’s unfortunate that people would often ask me: why would you spend (or in their case, waste) so much time in reading? And of course, there’s no point in answering their inquiry since they’ll never understand not unless they’ve read a book, unless they’ve lived in one. There are things that cannot be explained in life, only felt, like reading for example. Words hold feelings; they make meanings out of it. In this book, you’ll understand why it is a necessity to read, why it is a necessity to live.

Characters. It’s a love or hate kind-of relationship with the main character, which was A.J. (who would’ve guessed?!). But thank God did I like him! He reminds me so much of myself. Snobbish, biased and arrogant–just few qualities I inherit myself. For example, what he had with YA books. I, myself, don’t find YA as appealing or as attractive compare to adult books. (I do read YA, but I do have my biases. And I stand by them) But if that’s not your kind of thing then don’t worry. People change, and so will he (A.J.).

Funny. In a witty and sarcastic way.

I wanted to cry, just to make it a little more dramatic.. But I guess, I’m not much of an actress. This book is mainly about books, which would entail that it’s also about people, life, love, mistakes, second chance, family, change, time, happiness, and death. So with that I’ll leave you with these quotes:

“You know everything you need to know about a person from the answer to the question, What is your favorite book?” 

“How to account for its presence [on this list of favorites] when I know it is only average? The answer is this: Your dad relates to the characters. It has meaning to me. And the longer I do this (bookselling, yes, of course, but also living if that isn’t too awfully sentimental), the more I believe that this is what the point of it all is. To connect, my dear little nerd. Only connect.” 

I guarantee that reading this book will touch your heart, only if you have one.

Rating: ✰✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: As much as I love books

Recommended to: To people like you

(Fully Booked, Hardcover, P 1148)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: April 1st 2014 by Algonquin Books (first published January 1st 2014)

From Goodreads:

On the faded Island Books sign hanging over the porch of the Victorian cottage is the motto “No Man Is an Island; Every Book Is a World.” A. J. Fikry, the irascible owner, is about to discover just what that truly means.

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice Island-from Lambiase, the well-intentioned police officer who’s always felt kindly toward Fikry; from Ismay, his sister-in-law who is hell-bent on saving him from his dreary self; from Amelia, the lovely and idealistic (if eccentric) Knightley Press sales rep who keeps on taking the ferry over to Alice Island, refusing to be deterred by A.J.’s bad attitude. Even the books in his store have stopped holding pleasure for him. These days, A.J. can only see them as a sign of a world that is changing too rapidly.

And then a mysterious package appears at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in weight. It’s that unexpected arrival that gives A. J. Fikry the opportunity to make his life over, the ability to see everything anew. It doesn’t take long for the locals to notice the change overcoming A.J.; or for that determined sales rep, Amelia, to see her curmudgeonly client in a new light; or for the wisdom of all those books to become again the lifeblood of A.J.’s world; or for everything to twist again into a version of his life that he didn’t see coming. As surprising as it is moving, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is an unforgettable tale of transformation and second chances, an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love.