Thursday Quotables: Blindness (Blindness #1) by José Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator)

Blindness (Blindness #1) by José Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator)

Introducing Thursday Quotables where I share quotes from my current and/or throwback read! I’ve been meaning to put these kinds of posts out. But I haven’t got the time to actually write one. Sooo that’s my lame excuse.. Moving on to the main event.

The quotes:

“I don’t think we did go blind, I think we are blind, Blind but seeing, Blind people who can see, but do not see.”

“The difficult thing isn’t living with other people, it’s understanding them.”

“When all is said and done, what is clear is that all lives end before their time.”

“We are so afraid of the idea of having to die… that we always try to find excuses for the dead, as if we were asking beforehand to be excused when it is our turn…”

This is one of my favorite books, so be nice. And the last time I read this was like 5 years or so. And I loved every thing about it. It was way back before I had Goodreads, before this blog. So I actually don’t have any review up to show you. But believe me when I say, it changed my life. It changed my perspective of life. Made me realize the depths and complexity Adult Fiction is capable of. (Cheesy, I know)

It has a sequel (Seeing), actually. But I’m kind of scared, because of how good this one is. I think it’s quite impossible to surpass my expectation. I have no idea when to read it. Or if I have plans to read it. All I know is I have it; so when the time comes, I have all the opportunity to go for it.

And it also has a movie. LIKE WHERE WAS I WHEN THIS HAPPENED? This picture could actually pass for Walking Dead. I mean, look at this. It’s like their asking to be eaten or something. But I haven’t watched it either. I just don’t want it to spoil the moment. But hey, the probability of me watching the movie is higher than me reading the sequel. I just can’t see it. Like don’t you get that? I’m just too scared that it might not be as good as I wanted it to be. I sound whiny, hahaha.

Have you read this one? Or can you relate or connect with the quotes?? Do you feel me?? Comment down below and share! 🙂

(Hosted by: Bookshelf Fantasies)

(Pictures are not mine)

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Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

OceanAtTheEnd

Dude this guy can write anything.

A Neil Gaiman book doesn’t have a mind-blowing factor; it’s never overwhelming. With this guy, it’s the simplicity, the casualness that reels you in. The way he weaves fantasies to our world. How he creates fantasies that are often mistook as illusions or delusions today. The notion that fantasy is created in our world, so it must belong here.

Ocean at the End of the Lane is definitely your portal back to your childhood. To feel what it’s like to be scared, to cry, to run away, to be a kid again. Neil Gaiman should have his own genre, really. I don’t know why it isn’t invented yet.

How do I even begin to describe this book? It’s like reading someone else’s childhood–is the closest thing I can get. Not just reading actually. You get to experience someone’s childhood. Since the story has a personal feel to it. Said in a confidential and intimate manner that can’t help but penetrate your heart. And throughout the story, you’ll get to find and reconnect bits and pieces of your previous childhood.

Also I like how time is separated in this book, by either before or after. How childhood is categorized as “before”, considered as something to be left in the past. The notion that we cannot bring our past self with us, that we can’t be the same kid. So we tuck our childhood, our self away and lock it. Never to be seen again. That’s why we consider our childhood our old self. And our adult phase, our new self. Why is there a need to change? Why do we have to detach our self in order to we grow up? Why can’t we be the same person, the same “me”? (Getting really deep now) This book points that out. That we have a tendency, more like a stage, to disconnect ourselves and create a barrier in which we separate our old selves to our new. And I loved it.

Plus the characters were phenomenal. Where can I buy my own Lettie Hempstock?

*A side note: The back cover of the book, the pale boy standing on a water pipe or drain or something. It’s actually Neil Gaiman, himself, age 7.

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: It’s a given already.

Recommended to: To people who lost their childhood

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 640)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: June 18th 2013 by William Morrow Books

From Goodreads:

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly’s wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

Waiting on Wednesday: Us by David Nicholls

Us by David Nicholls 

Publication: September 30th 2014 by Hodder & Stoughton (first published January 1st 2014)

Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Romance, Family

From Goodreads:

‘I was looking forward to us growing old together. Me and you, growing old and dying together.’

‘Douglas, who in their right mind would look forward to that?’

Douglas Petersen understands his wife’s need to ‘rediscover herself’ now that their son is leaving home.

He just thought they’d be doing their rediscovering together.

So when Connie announces that she will be leaving, too, he resolves to make their last family holiday into the trip of a lifetime: one that will draw the three of them closer, and win the respect of his son. One that will make Connie fall in love with him all over again.

The hotels are booked, the tickets bought, the itinerary planned and printed.

What could possibly go wrong?

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)

Teaser Tuesday: Noggin by John Corey Whaley

Noggin by John Corey Whaley

I want to tell you a story about how you can suddenly wake up to find yourself living a life you were never supposed to live. It could happen to you, just like it happened to me, and you could try to get back the life you think you deserve to be living. Just like I did.

Currently reading a Young-Adult! Hah, it’s about time! And I’m actually enjoying this. It’s actually funny, well sometimes it is. And I like how nonchalant and happy-go-lucky the main character is.

It’s about this guy, Travis Coates, who has a cancer. And the only way to save him is to preserve his head (yes, ONLY his head) by freezing it. Next is to get a different body and reconnect it to his head. And they wait for five years, and now here he is.

I haven’t gone long though so I could only give you the story’s overview. But it sounds fun! And I had enough of YA romance for now. So this might work out.

Have you read this book? What do you think? Comment down below, so I would know!

(Hosted by: Should Be Reading)

(Pictures are not mine)

Review: Life After Life by Kate Atkinson

lifeafterlife

It’s like reading a book on shuffle.

Life After Life does not have a specific timeline in which the story follows. It’s basically about the characters. Which is fine, fantastic, even.

I know it’s quite impossible to understand a character completely since it would take more than a book or even a lifetime or so. And this 544-page book manage to compensate a lifetime worth of relationship between the reader and the character. And when a connection is made, it will trigger you to feel with the character, to empathize with her. And that’s when you know, you care for the character, that isn’t just a character anymore. Special mention goes to Ursula and Hugh.

And there’s the presence of war. One day you’re engaged and the next you’re not. A minute ago you were alive and the next you’re not. Maybe because it wasn’t morbid or grotesque that made me shiver more. It was how normal it felt to see dead bodies, how normal it is to look up and see bombs falling, how normal death is.

Although I think I would’ve appreciated it more, if I was an English myself. Since this book is targeted to that group the most. Nonetheless, it was amazing!

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: Yes

Recommended to: To people who deserve a second chance

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 720)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: April 2nd 2013 by Reagan Arthur Books (first published March 14th 2013)

From Goodreads:

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization.

Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.

Waiting on Wednesday: The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faberd

Publication: October 28th 2014 by Hogarth (first published October 6th 2014)

Genre: Fiction, Science Fiction (Dystopia), Fantasy, Religion

From Goodreads:

It begins with Peter, a devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Bea. Peter becomes immersed in the mysteries of an astonishing new environment, overseen by an enigmatic corporation known only as USIC. His work introduces him to a seemingly friendly native population struggling with a dangerous illness and hungry for Peter’s teachings—his Bible is their “book of strange new things.” But Peter is rattled when Bea’s letters from home become increasingly desperate: typhoons and earthquakes are devastating whole countries, and governments are crumbling. Bea’s faith, once the guiding light of their lives, begins to falter.

Suddenly, a separation measured by an otherworldly distance, and defined both by one newly discovered world and another in a state of collapse, is threatened by an ever-widening gulf that is much less quantifiable. While Peter is reconciling the needs of his congregation with the desires of his strange employer, Bea is struggling for survival. Their trials lay bare a profound meditation on faith, love tested beyond endurance, and our responsibility to those closest to us.

Marked by the same bravura storytelling and precise language that made The Crimson Petal and the White such an international success, The Book of Strange New Things is extraordinary, mesmerizing, and replete with emotional complexity and genuine pathos.

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)

Teaser Tuesday: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

There was no real sense of life because she had nothing to contrast it with. Oh but now, there was dying and loss and grief. Weeping and shuddering,terror and remorse. Now that she knows where we’re all going, she* feels every moment of  her life. 

* – Character’s name substituted to a pronoun

Introducing a new meme for my blog, hosted by Should Be Reading! And it’s Teaser Tuesday. I’ll be copying a few lines or so from the book that I am currently reading, which is so happens to be Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. And don’t worry I will avoid spoilers!

I’ve read one book from him, which is Damned. It’s actually a trilogy, I believe. And I already bought the second book (Doomed). Let’s just say it’s not his best work. So I don’t want to put a big-ass “X” on Chuck that fast. Which leads us to this book. His well known work, Fight Club. Btw, this already has a movie adaptation.

Have you read this book and/or watched the movie? Is it a love it or leave it? Comment down below, so I would know!

(Hosted by: Should Be Reading)

(Pictures are not mine)