Review: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

FightClub

Too much testosterone.

Fight Club has been my second Palahniuk read. So far, there’s one thing I’ve noticed: It’s either he loves putting sexual element to his books or he’s just pretty horny. You decide.

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Teaser Tuesday: The Girl with All the Gifts

The Girl with All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

The strap is designed so they never have to put their hands in front of Melanie’s face. Melanie sometimes says, “I won’t bite.” She says it as a joke, but Sergeant’s people never laugh.

Lez be real. It’s not Tuesday. But I’ve been watching a lot of Walking Dead (Video Game) in YouTube. I actually like it better than the actual TV Series, and it just feels a little more realistic plus less annoying. Anyway, I watched pewdiepie’s walk through in case you were wondering. I like how emotional and connected he is especially at the end of both seasons. *bro fist*

So obviously, this book is about zombie apocalypse! Which is horror, and I don’t normally read that genre. Let’s admit it. I’m pretty much a pussy, but a cute one. I’ve been loving it recently! I can tell that it’s a good book already. I’m excited to finish this, so I can share my opinion with you guys! The idea of zombies has always freaked me out. So I never really got the hype. But now, I get it why it’s so engaging. BECAUSE THEY’RE (literally) RUNNING FOR THEIR LIVES.

Tell me if you’ve read it! Or you have read something similar. I would really love to know if you enjoy these kinds of books, and if you have any recommendations for me to read. My book collection is in dire need of more horror books. But bear in mind that I’m still a beginner, so no Stephen King’s Carrie scary please, hahaha!

(Hosted by: Should Be Reading)

(Pictures are not mine)

Book Blogger Hop: Reading Environment

So I’m cheating a little bit because I didn’t pick this week’s question, mainly because I’m a rebel and I liked last week’s question better. Sue me.

Last week’s question is:

Can you read in a room with noise or do you have to have total quiet?

I definitely need silence, whenever I read. It doesn’t have to be completely quiet, but enough to keep me from getting distracted. I don’t know why, but I just can’t concentrate whenever I can hear noises. I actually envy people who could read while listening to music–that’s amazing! Go and audition for the Britain’s Got Talent! Pretty sure you’ll woe Simon in no time.

This is where I usually read. Plus the preview of the book I’m currently reading hehe. This place is perfect because I have an electric fan right beside me (because its hell here in the Philippines) to keep me from melting. It’s part of the living room and the kitchen is right around the corner. So snacks are in reachable distance. And I just lie here and read. Sometimes I get acrobatic and start doing different positions, hahaha!

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Review: Night Film by Marisha Pessl

Night Film

GO HOME NIGHT FILM, YOU’RE DRUNK

If you’re planning to read this, you’re pretty much fucked.The fact that this book didn’t warn me about its contents, which btw includes devil worship and witchcraft, is plain evil and just mean. If they placed Stephen King on the cover, then I would’ve known what I was dealing with. I can’t just guess what’s the book is about. I can read the blurb but it isn’t even close to the actual plot. So yeah, I was fucked.

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Review: I’m Not Scared by Niccolò Ammaniti, Jonathan Hunt (Translator)

ImNotScared

If it was not for the title, I would’ve liked it better.

You see, because of the title, I expect it to be (of course) scary. I expect it cause terror, inflict fear, because (obviously) that’s what the title implies. But besides the first part, there was nothing scary. And believe me, I’m the type of girl who freaks out when the light starts to flicker.

Maybe what the author was trying to point out was that the story itself reflects reality, heck, it is reality. And yes it’s sad, because younger ones pay the mistakes we committed. But I don’t think it’s near scary. Maybe tragic, unfortunate, depressing, awful. But definitely not scary.

Although, I do heavily agree with what the story was trying to tell. That the evil we commit, the evil we are consciously aware of doing, are usually made for our own advantage. And because of this we are blinded, we avoid to see the negative effects. Maybe because it doesn’t affect us, so it doesn’t really matter—which is pretty selfish. So we just shrug, and say its okay, let time do its thing. You see, we don’t get to pay the wrong things we’ve done, but the later generation does. They get to fix our shit, they have to. That’s pretty much what the story is trying to convey.

Read from the point of view of a nine year old, Michelle Amitrano, which makes this thriller/crime novel distinct and different. A secret was found by an innocent boy, under an old, abandoned farmhouse trying to claw its way out. A tragic book that will blur the lines between fiction and reality. That may or may not seep its way into you.

And btw, it has a movie already!

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Do I like it: It was fine

Recommended to: To people who lost their innocence

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 560-600)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: July 5th 2010 by Walker Canongate (first published January 1st 2001)

From Goodreads:

“Stop all this talk about monsters, Michele. Monsters don’t exist. It’s men you should be afraid of, not monsters.”

A sweltering heat wave hits a tiny village in Southern Italy, sending the adults to seek shelter, while their children bicycle freely throughout the countryside, playing games and getting into trouble. On a dare, nine-year-old Michele Amitrano enters an old, abandoned farmhouse, where he stumbles upon a secret so terrible that he can’t tell anybody. As the truth emerges, Michele learns that the horror in the creepy old house is closer to home than he ever imagined.

A widely acclaimed international bestseller, I’m Not Scared is a spine-tingling novel that combines a coming of age narrative with a satisfying, enthralling story of suspense.

Report: 100 Notable Books of 2014 by The New York Times

I just wanted to showcase New York Times’ 100 Notable Books of 2014. I have few books from the list–both read and unread ones. So I thought that it’ll be a good way to share some of it, just in case you’re looking for your next read. Enjoy! 🙂

The New York Times

The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE. By Anthony Doerr. (Scribner, $27.) The paths of a blind French girl and an orphaned German boy converge in this novel, set around the time of World War II.

5

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Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

AllTheLight

I kept on repeating, maybe I just missed a page.. this can’t end like this.

This book puts us in the minority (well what people think minority is) to show us all the light we cannot see, all the truth we deliberately avoid and reject to see.

I guess I never would’ve thought that this book would turn out the way it had. I like how this had a fantasy or magical element to it that I never encountered before, especially in historical fiction. Since I read a lot of historical fiction, that bit made it extra interesting and different.

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