Review: Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

DaughterofSmoke

When it comes to YA, almost everything is overhyped. And this is not an exception.

But to be honest, I wish it was. It had a lot of potential including the plot, writing style, variety of characters, and the fact that its fantasy, so I feel like there was an effort to do some studying. Still, it wasn’t enough to compensate all the hype it got.

Continue reading “Review: Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor”

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Report: 100 Notable Books of 2014 by The New York Times

I just wanted to showcase New York Times’ 100 Notable Books of 2014. I have few books from the list–both read and unread ones. So I thought that it’ll be a good way to share some of it, just in case you’re looking for your next read. Enjoy! 🙂

The New York Times

The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE. By Anthony Doerr. (Scribner, $27.) The paths of a blind French girl and an orphaned German boy converge in this novel, set around the time of World War II.

5

Continue reading “Report: 100 Notable Books of 2014 by The New York Times”

Thursday Quotables: Blindness (Blindness #1) by José Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator)

Blindness (Blindness #1) by José Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator)

Introducing Thursday Quotables where I share quotes from my current and/or throwback read! I’ve been meaning to put these kinds of posts out. But I haven’t got the time to actually write one. Sooo that’s my lame excuse.. Moving on to the main event.

The quotes:

“I don’t think we did go blind, I think we are blind, Blind but seeing, Blind people who can see, but do not see.”

“The difficult thing isn’t living with other people, it’s understanding them.”

“When all is said and done, what is clear is that all lives end before their time.”

“We are so afraid of the idea of having to die… that we always try to find excuses for the dead, as if we were asking beforehand to be excused when it is our turn…”

This is one of my favorite books, so be nice. And the last time I read this was like 5 years or so. And I loved every thing about it. It was way back before I had Goodreads, before this blog. So I actually don’t have any review up to show you. But believe me when I say, it changed my life. It changed my perspective of life. Made me realize the depths and complexity Adult Fiction is capable of. (Cheesy, I know)

It has a sequel (Seeing), actually. But I’m kind of scared, because of how good this one is. I think it’s quite impossible to surpass my expectation. I have no idea when to read it. Or if I have plans to read it. All I know is I have it; so when the time comes, I have all the opportunity to go for it.

And it also has a movie. LIKE WHERE WAS I WHEN THIS HAPPENED? This picture could actually pass for Walking Dead. I mean, look at this. It’s like their asking to be eaten or something. But I haven’t watched it either. I just don’t want it to spoil the moment. But hey, the probability of me watching the movie is higher than me reading the sequel. I just can’t see it. Like don’t you get that? I’m just too scared that it might not be as good as I wanted it to be. I sound whiny, hahaha.

Have you read this one? Or can you relate or connect with the quotes?? Do you feel me?? Comment down below and share! 🙂

(Hosted by: Bookshelf Fantasies)

(Pictures are not mine)

Waiting on Wednesday: Us by David Nicholls

Us by David Nicholls 

Publication: September 30th 2014 by Hodder & Stoughton (first published January 1st 2014)

Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Romance, Family

From Goodreads:

‘I was looking forward to us growing old together. Me and you, growing old and dying together.’

‘Douglas, who in their right mind would look forward to that?’

Douglas Petersen understands his wife’s need to ‘rediscover herself’ now that their son is leaving home.

He just thought they’d be doing their rediscovering together.

So when Connie announces that she will be leaving, too, he resolves to make their last family holiday into the trip of a lifetime: one that will draw the three of them closer, and win the respect of his son. One that will make Connie fall in love with him all over again.

The hotels are booked, the tickets bought, the itinerary planned and printed.

What could possibly go wrong?

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)

Waiting on Wednesday: The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faberd

Publication: October 28th 2014 by Hogarth (first published October 6th 2014)

Genre: Fiction, Science Fiction (Dystopia), Fantasy, Religion

From Goodreads:

It begins with Peter, a devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Bea. Peter becomes immersed in the mysteries of an astonishing new environment, overseen by an enigmatic corporation known only as USIC. His work introduces him to a seemingly friendly native population struggling with a dangerous illness and hungry for Peter’s teachings—his Bible is their “book of strange new things.” But Peter is rattled when Bea’s letters from home become increasingly desperate: typhoons and earthquakes are devastating whole countries, and governments are crumbling. Bea’s faith, once the guiding light of their lives, begins to falter.

Suddenly, a separation measured by an otherworldly distance, and defined both by one newly discovered world and another in a state of collapse, is threatened by an ever-widening gulf that is much less quantifiable. While Peter is reconciling the needs of his congregation with the desires of his strange employer, Bea is struggling for survival. Their trials lay bare a profound meditation on faith, love tested beyond endurance, and our responsibility to those closest to us.

Marked by the same bravura storytelling and precise language that made The Crimson Petal and the White such an international success, The Book of Strange New Things is extraordinary, mesmerizing, and replete with emotional complexity and genuine pathos.

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)

Top Ten Tuesdays: Top New Series I Want To Start

First thing’s first, (I’m the realist) I’m going to go ahead and say that most of the books here are YA (young-adult) fantasy. So yes, I do read YA. I just don’t read it a lot, lol. Enjoy!

*For more information about the book, click the (image of the) book or the title.

Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles #1) by Melina Marchetta

I’m not gonna lie. It’s not the greatest book cover but the start-up line is pretty cool–“At the age of nine, Finnikin is warned by the gods that he must sacrifice a pound of flesh to save his kingdom.” 

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn (Eon #1) by Alison Goodman

I have a confession. I haven’t read any book that contains dragon or has something to do with dragons. So this one particularly caught my eye since (they say) the protagonist, which is a girl, is so bad ass! So why not?

The Young Elites (The Young Elites #1) by Marie Lu

I’ve been seeing this a lot in my goodreads timeline. And when I read the plot, sparks flew. And also because my sister has been recommending me to read Legend by Marie Lu but I wasn’t into the plot, so i opted for this one.

The Archived (The Archived #1) by Victoria Schwab

“Imagine a place where the dead rest on shelves like books.” Sounds good to me.

Code Name Verity (Code Name Verity #1) by Elizabeth Wein

I’ve been eying this out for a while now and I think I regret not buying this. This centers in WWII with strong female protagonist. Again, with strong female protagonist.

Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass #1) by Sarah J. Maas

I wanna know what the hype is all about.

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Dude her natural hair color is blue. I gotta have that stuff. This is actually included in my Timely TBR, so review will be up soon!

Shadow and Bone (The Grisha #1) by Leigh Bardugo

I’ve been lusting over this one. This has been receiving a lot of hype recently. And I knew this book even before it was hyped up, but a lot of people have been liking the series (not the first book) so much that it makes me kind of curious enough to read it. AND TALK ABOUT THAT COVER, PLEASE.

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer

Re-tellings of different fairy tales including Cinderella, Little Red Ridding Hood and Rapunzel. Jeez, that sounds freaking amazing. Cinder is Cindarella’s re-telling apparently she becomes a cyborg of some sort. Also A+ for the cover!

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking #1) by Patrick Ness

“Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise.” YES, PATRICK NESS. YES!

(Hosted by: The Broke and the Bookish)

(Pictures are not mine)

Review: Fahrenheit 451 By Ray Bradbury

Fahrenhiet 451I can’t do a full review for now since I cannot study this classic as in-depth as much as I want to, because of the (obvious) TBR pile I carelessly accumulated. But if you’ve been eyeing on this book, I highly recommend this edition (60th Anniversary Edition) since it has additional excerpts about the book—it’s process, inspiration and history. Although most are from different authors, Ray Bradbury also has his solo parts. This might also require a reread.

Nonetheless, I did enjoy it!

But for now, I’m terribly sorry.

Rating: ✰✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: Yes

Recommended to: To people who question the power of books

(Fullybooked, Paperback, P 560)

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Below are information about this book.

Publication: March 28th 2013 by Voyager (first published 1953)

From Goodreads:

The terrifyingly prophetic novel of a post-literate future.

Guy Montag is a fireman. His job is to burn books, which are forbidden, being the source of all discord and unhappiness. Even so, Montag is unhappy; there is discord in his marriage. Are books hidden in his house? The Mechanical Hound of the Fire Department, armed with a lethal hypodermic, escorted by helicopters, is ready to track down those dissidents who defy society to preserve and read books.

The classic dystopian novel of a post-literate future, Fahrenheit 451 stands alongside Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World as a prophetic account of Western civilization’s enslavement by the media, drugs and conformity.

Bradbury’s powerful and poetic prose combines with uncanny insight into the potential of technology to create a novel which, decades on from first publication, still has the power to dazzle and shock