Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

OceanAtTheEnd

Dude this guy can write anything.

A Neil Gaiman book doesn’t have a mind-blowing factor; it’s never overwhelming. With this guy, it’s the simplicity, the casualness that reels you in. The way he weaves fantasies to our world. How he creates fantasies that are often mistook as illusions or delusions today. The notion that fantasy is created in our world, so it must belong here.

Ocean at the End of the Lane is definitely your portal back to your childhood. To feel what it’s like to be scared, to cry, to run away, to be a kid again. Neil Gaiman should have his own genre, really. I don’t know why it isn’t invented yet.

How do I even begin to describe this book? It’s like reading someone else’s childhood–is the closest thing I can get. Not just reading actually. You get to experience someone’s childhood. Since the story has a personal feel to it. Said in a confidential and intimate manner that can’t help but penetrate your heart. And throughout the story, you’ll get to find and reconnect bits and pieces of your previous childhood.

Also I like how time is separated in this book, by either before or after. How childhood is categorized as “before”, considered as something to be left in the past. The notion that we cannot bring our past self with us, that we can’t be the same kid. So we tuck our childhood, our self away and lock it. Never to be seen again. That’s why we consider our childhood our old self. And our adult phase, our new self. Why is there a need to change? Why do we have to detach our self in order to we grow up? Why can’t we be the same person, the same “me”? (Getting really deep now) This book points that out. That we have a tendency, more like a stage, to disconnect ourselves and create a barrier in which we separate our old selves to our new. And I loved it.

Plus the characters were phenomenal. Where can I buy my own Lettie Hempstock?

*A side note: The back cover of the book, the pale boy standing on a water pipe or drain or something. It’s actually Neil Gaiman, himself, age 7.

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: It’s a given already.

Recommended to: To people who lost their childhood

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 640)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: June 18th 2013 by William Morrow Books

From Goodreads:

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly’s wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

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Waiting on Wednesday: Us by David Nicholls

Us by David Nicholls 

Publication: September 30th 2014 by Hodder & Stoughton (first published January 1st 2014)

Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Romance, Family

From Goodreads:

‘I was looking forward to us growing old together. Me and you, growing old and dying together.’

‘Douglas, who in their right mind would look forward to that?’

Douglas Petersen understands his wife’s need to ‘rediscover herself’ now that their son is leaving home.

He just thought they’d be doing their rediscovering together.

So when Connie announces that she will be leaving, too, he resolves to make their last family holiday into the trip of a lifetime: one that will draw the three of them closer, and win the respect of his son. One that will make Connie fall in love with him all over again.

The hotels are booked, the tickets bought, the itinerary planned and printed.

What could possibly go wrong?

(Hosted by: Breaking the Spine)

(Pictures are not mine)