Timely To Be Read: Fruit Salad

Fruit Salad is the perfect name for this TTBR since there’s a lot of mix of genres. And let’s be honest, I’ve been craving fruit salad recently. So this time, TTBR includes 9 books! My highest book number–achievement unlocked! And it’s purely adult fiction, so I’m sorry I didn’t include YA. I just couldn’t! I just had enough YA for now.

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Review: I’m Not Scared by Niccolò Ammaniti, Jonathan Hunt (Translator)

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If it was not for the title, I would’ve liked it better.

You see, because of the title, I expect it to be (of course) scary. I expect it cause terror, inflict fear, because (obviously) that’s what the title implies. But besides the first part, there was nothing scary. And believe me, I’m the type of girl who freaks out when the light starts to flicker.

Maybe what the author was trying to point out was that the story itself reflects reality, heck, it is reality. And yes it’s sad, because younger ones pay the mistakes we committed. But I don’t think it’s near scary. Maybe tragic, unfortunate, depressing, awful. But definitely not scary.

Although, I do heavily agree with what the story was trying to tell. That the evil we commit, the evil we are consciously aware of doing, are usually made for our own advantage. And because of this we are blinded, we avoid to see the negative effects. Maybe because it doesn’t affect us, so it doesn’t really matter—which is pretty selfish. So we just shrug, and say its okay, let time do its thing. You see, we don’t get to pay the wrong things we’ve done, but the later generation does. They get to fix our shit, they have to. That’s pretty much what the story is trying to convey.

Read from the point of view of a nine year old, Michelle Amitrano, which makes this thriller/crime novel distinct and different. A secret was found by an innocent boy, under an old, abandoned farmhouse trying to claw its way out. A tragic book that will blur the lines between fiction and reality. That may or may not seep its way into you.

And btw, it has a movie already!

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Do I like it: It was fine

Recommended to: To people who lost their innocence

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 560-600)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: July 5th 2010 by Walker Canongate (first published January 1st 2001)

From Goodreads:

“Stop all this talk about monsters, Michele. Monsters don’t exist. It’s men you should be afraid of, not monsters.”

A sweltering heat wave hits a tiny village in Southern Italy, sending the adults to seek shelter, while their children bicycle freely throughout the countryside, playing games and getting into trouble. On a dare, nine-year-old Michele Amitrano enters an old, abandoned farmhouse, where he stumbles upon a secret so terrible that he can’t tell anybody. As the truth emerges, Michele learns that the horror in the creepy old house is closer to home than he ever imagined.

A widely acclaimed international bestseller, I’m Not Scared is a spine-tingling novel that combines a coming of age narrative with a satisfying, enthralling story of suspense.

Report: 100 Notable Books of 2014 by The New York Times

I just wanted to showcase New York Times’ 100 Notable Books of 2014. I have few books from the list–both read and unread ones. So I thought that it’ll be a good way to share some of it, just in case you’re looking for your next read. Enjoy! 🙂

The New York Times

The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE. By Anthony Doerr. (Scribner, $27.) The paths of a blind French girl and an orphaned German boy converge in this novel, set around the time of World War II.

5

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Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

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I kept on repeating, maybe I just missed a page.. this can’t end like this.

This book puts us in the minority (well what people think minority is) to show us all the light we cannot see, all the truth we deliberately avoid and reject to see.

I guess I never would’ve thought that this book would turn out the way it had. I like how this had a fantasy or magical element to it that I never encountered before, especially in historical fiction. Since I read a lot of historical fiction, that bit made it extra interesting and different.

Continue reading “Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr”

Review: Life After Life by Kate Atkinson

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It’s like reading a book on shuffle.

Life After Life does not have a specific timeline in which the story follows. It’s basically about the characters. Which is fine, fantastic, even.

I know it’s quite impossible to understand a character completely since it would take more than a book or even a lifetime or so. And this 544-page book manage to compensate a lifetime worth of relationship between the reader and the character. And when a connection is made, it will trigger you to feel with the character, to empathize with her. And that’s when you know, you care for the character, that isn’t just a character anymore. Special mention goes to Ursula and Hugh.

And there’s the presence of war. One day you’re engaged and the next you’re not. A minute ago you were alive and the next you’re not. Maybe because it wasn’t morbid or grotesque that made me shiver more. It was how normal it felt to see dead bodies, how normal it is to look up and see bombs falling, how normal death is.

Although I think I would’ve appreciated it more, if I was an English myself. Since this book is targeted to that group the most. Nonetheless, it was amazing!

Rating: ✰✰✰✰

Do I like it: Yes

Recommended to: To people who deserve a second chance

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 720)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: April 2nd 2013 by Reagan Arthur Books (first published March 14th 2013)

From Goodreads:

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization.

Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.

Top Ten Tuesdays: Top New Series I Want To Start

First thing’s first, (I’m the realist) I’m going to go ahead and say that most of the books here are YA (young-adult) fantasy. So yes, I do read YA. I just don’t read it a lot, lol. Enjoy!

*For more information about the book, click the (image of the) book or the title.

Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles #1) by Melina Marchetta

I’m not gonna lie. It’s not the greatest book cover but the start-up line is pretty cool–“At the age of nine, Finnikin is warned by the gods that he must sacrifice a pound of flesh to save his kingdom.” 

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn (Eon #1) by Alison Goodman

I have a confession. I haven’t read any book that contains dragon or has something to do with dragons. So this one particularly caught my eye since (they say) the protagonist, which is a girl, is so bad ass! So why not?

The Young Elites (The Young Elites #1) by Marie Lu

I’ve been seeing this a lot in my goodreads timeline. And when I read the plot, sparks flew. And also because my sister has been recommending me to read Legend by Marie Lu but I wasn’t into the plot, so i opted for this one.

The Archived (The Archived #1) by Victoria Schwab

“Imagine a place where the dead rest on shelves like books.” Sounds good to me.

Code Name Verity (Code Name Verity #1) by Elizabeth Wein

I’ve been eying this out for a while now and I think I regret not buying this. This centers in WWII with strong female protagonist. Again, with strong female protagonist.

Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass #1) by Sarah J. Maas

I wanna know what the hype is all about.

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Dude her natural hair color is blue. I gotta have that stuff. This is actually included in my Timely TBR, so review will be up soon!

Shadow and Bone (The Grisha #1) by Leigh Bardugo

I’ve been lusting over this one. This has been receiving a lot of hype recently. And I knew this book even before it was hyped up, but a lot of people have been liking the series (not the first book) so much that it makes me kind of curious enough to read it. AND TALK ABOUT THAT COVER, PLEASE.

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer

Re-tellings of different fairy tales including Cinderella, Little Red Ridding Hood and Rapunzel. Jeez, that sounds freaking amazing. Cinder is Cindarella’s re-telling apparently she becomes a cyborg of some sort. Also A+ for the cover!

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking #1) by Patrick Ness

“Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise.” YES, PATRICK NESS. YES!

(Hosted by: The Broke and the Bookish)

(Pictures are not mine)