Review: The Martian by Andy Weir

Martian

Bring him back to Mars.

Science fiction is not on my top-to-buy list. It’s not even on the list. The reality of me picking and reading The Martian is highly unfathomable. But I guess, it’s destiny. Or it could be shit.

Well it’s, definitely, shit. Let me explain myself.

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Review: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

FightClub

Too much testosterone.

Fight Club has been my second Palahniuk read. So far, there’s one thing I’ve noticed: It’s either he loves putting sexual element to his books or he’s just pretty horny. You decide.

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Review: Make Good Art by Neil Gaiman, Chip Kidd (Designer)

Deciding to get an art course is to decide on a lot of things.

It’s to decide whether your passion would be enough to put food on the table, to afford a roof over your head, to pay the monthly bills—to earn a living. You’ll have a constant doubt. But you keep moving, until you reached graduation and everything hits you.. you have no damn clue where to start.

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Review: The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith

Statistical Probability of Love at First SightBullshit.

“Hadley meets the perfect boy. Oliver is British, sits in her row.”

Bullshit. This part of the blurb is hilarious. Is being British one of the qualifications to be called perfect? I’ve read the novel. Pretty sure he’s no near Johnny Deep (aka perfection).

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Review: My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick

My Life Next Door

Typical.

Samantha, a white girl, thinks she’s so “normal,” and I quote, “..blond hair, blue eyes, freckles, nothing special” Damn right you are! You keep on talking like that and you’ll be every other girl in the neighbourhood. You’re a rich girl. I’m sure we can find and buy you something special. So stop fucking moaning.

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Review: I’m Not Scared by Niccolò Ammaniti, Jonathan Hunt (Translator)

ImNotScared

If it was not for the title, I would’ve liked it better.

You see, because of the title, I expect it to be (of course) scary. I expect it cause terror, inflict fear, because (obviously) that’s what the title implies. But besides the first part, there was nothing scary. And believe me, I’m the type of girl who freaks out when the light starts to flicker.

Maybe what the author was trying to point out was that the story itself reflects reality, heck, it is reality. And yes it’s sad, because younger ones pay the mistakes we committed. But I don’t think it’s near scary. Maybe tragic, unfortunate, depressing, awful. But definitely not scary.

Although, I do heavily agree with what the story was trying to tell. That the evil we commit, the evil we are consciously aware of doing, are usually made for our own advantage. And because of this we are blinded, we avoid to see the negative effects. Maybe because it doesn’t affect us, so it doesn’t really matter—which is pretty selfish. So we just shrug, and say its okay, let time do its thing. You see, we don’t get to pay the wrong things we’ve done, but the later generation does. They get to fix our shit, they have to. That’s pretty much what the story is trying to convey.

Read from the point of view of a nine year old, Michelle Amitrano, which makes this thriller/crime novel distinct and different. A secret was found by an innocent boy, under an old, abandoned farmhouse trying to claw its way out. A tragic book that will blur the lines between fiction and reality. That may or may not seep its way into you.

And btw, it has a movie already!

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Do I like it: It was fine

Recommended to: To people who lost their innocence

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 560-600)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: July 5th 2010 by Walker Canongate (first published January 1st 2001)

From Goodreads:

“Stop all this talk about monsters, Michele. Monsters don’t exist. It’s men you should be afraid of, not monsters.”

A sweltering heat wave hits a tiny village in Southern Italy, sending the adults to seek shelter, while their children bicycle freely throughout the countryside, playing games and getting into trouble. On a dare, nine-year-old Michele Amitrano enters an old, abandoned farmhouse, where he stumbles upon a secret so terrible that he can’t tell anybody. As the truth emerges, Michele learns that the horror in the creepy old house is closer to home than he ever imagined.

A widely acclaimed international bestseller, I’m Not Scared is a spine-tingling novel that combines a coming of age narrative with a satisfying, enthralling story of suspense.

Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

AllTheLight

I kept on repeating, maybe I just missed a page.. this can’t end like this.

This book puts us in the minority (well what people think minority is) to show us all the light we cannot see, all the truth we deliberately avoid and reject to see.

I guess I never would’ve thought that this book would turn out the way it had. I like how this had a fantasy or magical element to it that I never encountered before, especially in historical fiction. Since I read a lot of historical fiction, that bit made it extra interesting and different.

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