Review: My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick

My Life Next Door

Typical.

Samantha, a white girl, thinks she’s so “normal,” and I quote, “..blond hair, blue eyes, freckles, nothing special” Damn right you are! You keep on talking like that and you’ll be every other girl in the neighbourhood. You’re a rich girl. I’m sure we can find and buy you something special. So stop fucking moaning.

Continue reading “Review: My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick”

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Timely To Be Read: A Mix of Everything

yk4Ug9jHOkay, I learned. I don’t want to make this post lengthy because (let’s face it) it’s boring. I’ll just be putting the synopsis of each book.

As you can see, this Timely TBR consists of different genres–adult, young-adult, thriller, humor and crime. There is a lot of variety in this TBR and I’m so excited to dive in!

NZBSG16-Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

“Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy..”

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 640)

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr | 

“Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks (there are thousands of locks in the museum). When she is six, she goes blind, and her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, every house, every manhole, so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie-Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall..”

(Fully Booked, Tall/Large Paperback, P 640)

KRdNz_uzI’m Not Scared by Niccolò Ammaniti 

“One relentlessly hot summer, six children explore the scorched wheat-fields that enclose their tiny Italian village. When the gang find a dilapidated farmhouse, nine-year-old Michele makes a discovery so momentous he dare not tell a soul. It is a secret that will force him to question everything and everyone around him..”

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 500+)

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor  

“Meet Karou. She fills her sketchbooks with monsters that may or may not be real, she’s prone to disappearing on mysterious “errands”, she speaks many languages – not all of them human – and her bright blue hair actually grows out of her head that color. Who is she? That is the question that haunts her, and she’s about to find out..”

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 399)

aafw3cH7Night Film by Marisha Pessl 

“Everybody has a Cordova story. Cult horror director Stanislas Cordova hasn’t been seen in public since 1977. To his fans he is an engima. To journalist Scott McGrath he is the enemy. To Ashley he was a father..”

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 440)

Noggin by John Corey Whaley 

“The in between part is still a little fuzzy, but he can tell you that, at some point or another, his head got chopped off and shoved into a freezer in Denver, Colorado. Five years later, it was reattached to some other guy’s body, and well, here he is. Despite all logic, he’s still 16 and everything and everyone around him has changed. That includes his bedroom, his parents, his best friend, and his girlfriend. Or maybe she’s not his girlfriend anymore? That’s a bit fuzzy too..”

(Fully Booked, Hard Cover, P 760)

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk 

“The first rule about fight club is you don’t talk about fight club..”

(Fully Booked, Paperback, P 748)

Top Ten Tuesdays: Top New Series I Want To Start

First thing’s first, (I’m the realist) I’m going to go ahead and say that most of the books here are YA (young-adult) fantasy. So yes, I do read YA. I just don’t read it a lot, lol. Enjoy!

*For more information about the book, click the (image of the) book or the title.

Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles #1) by Melina Marchetta

I’m not gonna lie. It’s not the greatest book cover but the start-up line is pretty cool–“At the age of nine, Finnikin is warned by the gods that he must sacrifice a pound of flesh to save his kingdom.” 

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn (Eon #1) by Alison Goodman

I have a confession. I haven’t read any book that contains dragon or has something to do with dragons. So this one particularly caught my eye since (they say) the protagonist, which is a girl, is so bad ass! So why not?

The Young Elites (The Young Elites #1) by Marie Lu

I’ve been seeing this a lot in my goodreads timeline. And when I read the plot, sparks flew. And also because my sister has been recommending me to read Legend by Marie Lu but I wasn’t into the plot, so i opted for this one.

The Archived (The Archived #1) by Victoria Schwab

“Imagine a place where the dead rest on shelves like books.” Sounds good to me.

Code Name Verity (Code Name Verity #1) by Elizabeth Wein

I’ve been eying this out for a while now and I think I regret not buying this. This centers in WWII with strong female protagonist. Again, with strong female protagonist.

Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass #1) by Sarah J. Maas

I wanna know what the hype is all about.

Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Dude her natural hair color is blue. I gotta have that stuff. This is actually included in my Timely TBR, so review will be up soon!

Shadow and Bone (The Grisha #1) by Leigh Bardugo

I’ve been lusting over this one. This has been receiving a lot of hype recently. And I knew this book even before it was hyped up, but a lot of people have been liking the series (not the first book) so much that it makes me kind of curious enough to read it. AND TALK ABOUT THAT COVER, PLEASE.

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer

Re-tellings of different fairy tales including Cinderella, Little Red Ridding Hood and Rapunzel. Jeez, that sounds freaking amazing. Cinder is Cindarella’s re-telling apparently she becomes a cyborg of some sort. Also A+ for the cover!

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking #1) by Patrick Ness

“Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise.” YES, PATRICK NESS. YES!

(Hosted by: The Broke and the Bookish)

(Pictures are not mine)

Review: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

night circus

Never have I felt so fooled than this.

The concept. A duel between two well trained magicians? Count me in. A duel between two well trained magicians AND lovers? Give it to me. It all sounds right to me. It sounds perfect. I think this could be a perfect match for my frozen heart. This could be it. And then again, I could be wrong.

Before I rant, I would like to say that I really wanted to like it. I wanted to. I tried to.

And after being promised of a “fierce competition”, “duel” and “headfirst into love”, lies are what the book told. Maybe it didn’t help that I read The Golem and The Jinni first. Now, try as I might, it’s impossible for me not to compare the two, especially since its soo similar—forbidden love-esque, the presence of magic, toying with fate/destiny. Nonetheless, I still had (false) hope. That maybe, just maybe, in the end it’ll be all worth it. And let’s just say, it was a complete waste of my time.

The writing, didn’t speak to me, it felt (sort of) fake. It was supposed to be magical, entrancing, dreamy. But it felt like it was trying too hard that it came of as a bad imitation of what it should’ve been. What I’m trying to say is that it didn’t feel real; it didn’t felt true.

And again with the lies:

Fierce competition. When did that happen?! Did I miss a chapter or so? They weren’t physically or mentally fighting. The continuity of the performance is the sole basis of the said “competition”. So basically, it’s just an endurance test. And it just goes on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on.. This book itself is an endurance test—whether you’re strong or foolish enough to finish it.

Duel. You can say that again. There are no flame-throwing, gesture-binding and tongue twister spells involved. More like a snap of a finger and boring written spells. See, they’re trying to redefine things. A true duel would mean that they would meet and fight. But no, they don’t want it to be that easy. Do they? By duel they mean, no contact with the other “fighter”—yes, they did meet; but whenever they do, they don’t fight, not ever—and no “round one, fight!”—so basically you NEVER know when they’re fighting because they themselves (characters) don’t know either. By duel they actually mean, fighting but without an actual fight.

Headfirst into love. By part three, they immediately KNEW they were in love. And no, they did not FELL in love.

For your own sake, skip this.

Rating: ✰✰

Do I like it: I wish

Recommended to: To people who like wasting their time

(Fully Booked, Mass Paperback, P 299)


Below are information about this book.

Publication: September 13th 2011 by Doubleday (first published January 1st 2010)

From Goodreads:

The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.